Bikram Yoga Classes that Make You Sweat

A Guide to Bikram Yoga Classes and Gear for Monterey

Month: February 2019

What is Health ?

THE PRINCIPLES OF OPTIMAL HEALTH

1. A Positive Self-Image .
2. A Diet Free of Toxic Foods That Supplies Optimal Levels
of All Beneficial Nutrients
3. Clean Air and Living Environment, Pure Water, and
Adequate Sunshine .
4. Adequate Exercise and Rest

Positive Mental Outlook

You cannot be healthy on any level until you are healthy on every level. The key to it all is a positive self-image.

Until you have adequate self esteem, all of the information you amass about getting healthy will do you no good, for you will not think highly enough of yourself to use it.

Along with self-esteem, we need to cultivate personal responsibility. No one keeps you healthy. Nutritionists, nutritionally oriented physicians, naturopaths, osteopaths, chiropractors coach. It is up to you to keep yourself healthy..

Optimal Intake of All Beneficial Nutrients

Adequate amounts of essential nutrients will eliminate deficiencies, but will not prevent cancer or heart disease.

Even a high-potency multivitamin, while a good start, is only the beginning. You need to get all forty-five nutrients in optimal amounts.

These amounts will differ for each person and his or her unique metabolism and lifestyle.

We need, however,more than just the ones that are essential: We need all that are beneficial..We need to examine so called nonessential nutrients such as CoQ10,carnitine, GLA ,taurine, and N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC).

While these nutrients are made by the body in’ small amounts, the only way to get them in optimal amounts is through supplements.

Other nonessential protective substances include polyphenols from plants that have tremendous protective and therapeutic ability.2.3Investigate all nutrients and take those you find most helpful.

All beneficial nutrients are essential for those who want health at the highest level.

Avoid Toxic Foods and Contaminants

  • Margarine, vegetable shortenings, and baked goods containing “partially hydrogenated oil”
  • Fried foods of all kinds, including fried ,chips from the health food store. Stir-frying is okay.
  • Supermarket vegetable oils such as corn, sunflower, safflower, and canola oils that have had all of the nutrients refined out of them. These nutritionally naked junk oils contain toxic trans fats, are often rancid, and cause disease.
  • Consume only virgin flax, canola, and olive oils that are stored in opaque containers and pressed at low temperatures from organic sources.
  • White flour, bleached flour, bromated flour, even “wheat flour.” It has to say “whole wheat flour.” If it does not say “whole wheat” or “wholegrain,” avoid it.
  • Unless you are a menstruating woman, avoid Product 19, Total, and all cereals and foods that have the full RDA for iron added to them. The overconsumption of iron poses a serious health threat for men and postmenopausal women.
  • Sugar in all forms: high-fructose corn syrup, barley malt, fruit juice concentrate, honey, molasses, maple syrup, invert sugar,etc.
  • Avoid baking powder that contains aluminum, aluminum foil, and aluminum pots and pans. Aluminum is implicated in causing Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Coffee, caffeinated or not. It is loaded with pesticides and free-radical-producing hydrocarbons, and stains your spleen and liver the color of the bottom of a coffee cup. . Additives: Buy food that does not have chemical preservatives, artificial .colors, emulsifiers, or other synthetic agents. Americans eat many pounds of these chemicals per year and have the toxic bodies to prove it.
  • Foods that you may be sensitive to. Wheat, gluten-containing grains, dairy products, and yeast-containing foods are common offenders. Your nutritionist or holistic M.D. can help you pinpoint foods that may be troublesome for you.
  • Produce grown with pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides. Eat vegetables no’ matter what kind you buy, but organic produce is best. Organic foods are those grown without harmful chemicals. Pesticides have been implicated in causing a wide range of diseases including cancer and impaired brain function in the elderly.
  • Avoid peanuts and peanut butter unless the manufacturer certifies them aflatoxin-free. Afiatoxin is a powerfully carcinogenic mold that grows easily on these legumes as well as corn and is believed to cause thousands of cases of liver cancer per year.
  • Chicken, meat, and eggs from animals fed hormones and antibiotics. Free-range animals have more essential fatty acids, less total fat, and make healthier meat and eggs.
  • Avoid fish from polluted waters. Raw or undercooked fish should also be avoided as it can harbor parasites. . Keep alcohol consumption to a minimum, and make organic red wine your drink of choice if you drink.

A Clean Environment

Pure water that is free of fluoride (once used as a rat poison), chlorine, and other toxins is essential to good health.

Buy ~pring or distilled water or invest in a high-quality water filter system. Filters for the shower-head are also very important.

Clean air and adequate sunshine are also important for adequate immune function and disease prevention. Air filters may be necessities for city dwellers.

Adequate Exercise

American extremes in exercise are like a college football game: twenty-two people ~eating their brains out on the field with eighty-thousand people sitting around watching.

Some overdo it and many do nothing at all. walking, swimming, cross- country machines, or mini trampolines may offer the most overall benefits. Any exercise you like to do is better than none.

Dancing, racquetball, and other participatory sports are increasingly popular for the fun they add to movement.

Remember: Even five to ten minutes of walking or any exercise is a fine beginning. Bowling, touch football, walking the dog more frequently-anything that gets you moving is worthwhile.

Don’t let an all-or-nothing approach stop you before you start.

Get Enough Rest

Sleep adequately. If you need an alarm to wake you, you, are not getting enough rest.

Go to bed as early as possible and sleep until you wake refreshed. Exercise and good nutrition help the body sleep more deeply.

Eat According to Individual Needs

We all have unique biochemistries. When the media tells you to eat a low-fat diet, take calcium, or eat a lot of carbohydrates, its prescriptions may run counter to your body’s nutritional needs.

Everything in your diet. must be customized. That usually requires the guidance of a nutritionist or nutritionally oriented doctor, but is well worth the visit or two it takes to get you on the right track.

Nutrition Is Celebratory

Optimal health is not the result of deprivation. It celebrates the benefits of many foods and nutrients, allowing us more of life and health. It is the marriage of science and pleasure.

Balance the information to your own best advantage. Discard that which is too difficult and use that which suits you. Don’t try to be perfect or avoid all of your favorite foods, even if some of .

them are “bad.” Improve your diet and lifestyle at whatever pace is best for you. Improving your health this way will only add to your enyoyment of life.

What Is a Healthy Diet?

WE WALK THROUGH THE SUPER MARKET as if it were a minefield. Food has become the enemy.

We have our list of subversive food elements, and do our best to avoid them. We do everything to avoid fat, cholesterol, and the dangerous food of the day.

Eating less fat and food additives is not a bad idea. A healthy diet, however, is not arrived at by process of elimination.

It is assembled from the foods with the most beneficial substances. More often than not, it is what we fail to eat that causes health problems, not merely what we do eat.

Before we can get a grasp of the elements of a healthy diet, the food industry takes advantage of our confusion.

Foods are marketed not on the basis of what they have, but of what they lack. Sugar and white flour are mixed together with toxic additives to create cakes that are “fat-free.”

Margarine-a destructive food if ever there was one – is sold to you under the guise of being “cholesterol-free.“And fried corn chips are celebrated for having “one-third less salt.”

THE NEW APPROACH: EATING FOOD FOR WHAT IT HAS

While eating less fat is good, getting the full range of nutrients needed to handle fat is better.

Eating less sugar is beneficial, but get the fiber, B vitamins, and minerals like zinc and chromium needed to metabolize the small amounts of sugar you do eat.

Avoid cholesterol only if it is oxidized. Oxidized cholesterol is found in processed foods or results in the body when there is a lack of antioxidant nutrients.

Oxidized cholesterol is found in powdered milk, scrambled or powdered eggs, mass-produced cakes and cake mixes, aged cheese, and aged meats such as sausages and aged steaks.

Cholesterol in boiled eggs, fresh meat, and seafood is harmless when accompanied by vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, and a healthy diet.

The end of confusion in nutrition comes only when we understand the basic principles of healthy eating.

Adopting these principles, we will find that everything-even a lot of the so-called conflicting information – falls into place.

THE PRINCIPLES OF HEALTHY EATING

  • Eat whole, unrefined foods high in nutrient density and as close to their natural state as possible.
  • Eat as wide a variety of foods as possible. .
  • Eat a diet that promoted longevity in your ancestors.
  • Eat according to the needs of your own unique bi9- chemistry and lifestyle.

You may be more surprised by what is not on this list than what is on it. Shouldn’t we lower our fat intake?

Eating foods close to their natural state will do that to the degree that it is necessary. What about decreasing sugar intake?

Whole, unrefined foods are low sugar. How much protein? You rancestors’ diet and the requirements of your own biochemistry dictate more about your protein needs than the current nutrition fad of the day.

Healthy eating principles don’t lead to a restrictive, boring diet. Bland food is not necessarily health-promoting. Herbs, spices, condiments, and interesting ways of preparing foods are often beneficial.

Many herbs we use to flavor foods are actually important- sources of trace minerals and immune-boosting pigments known as bioflavonoids.

What is Carbohydarete ?

CARBOHYDRATES ARE FOODS That are rich in sugars or complexes of sugars. How the sugars are arranged will determine whether we call a food a source of simple or complex carbohydrates.

Fruits and sugars are simple carbohydrates because they contain easily digested sugars.

When sugars are bound into rows, as they are in starches such as whole grains and legumes, they are called complex carbohydrates.

Just as it takes you much longer to know a complicated person, it takes the body much longer to digest the sugar from a complex carbohydrate.

Most of the benefits attributed to carbohydrate foods come from the slower-digesting, complex variety. Complex carbohydrates are, in general, better because they take longer to digest.

The sugars in these foods enter the body more slowly. They do not cause the sharp increase in blood sugar that can be caused by simple.

carbohydrates, especially sugars such as white sugar, honey, and other concentrated sweeteners.

Even fruit, as bountiful as it is in vitamins and minerals and fiber, should not be viewed as a food that can be eaten with abandon.

More than three servings of fruit per day has been found to raise triglyceride levels in sedentary people. A higher intake of fruit is only appropriate for the very active.

Carbohydrate foods in their natural state have many benefits: They are high in fiber, low in fat, and a good source of vitamins.

They can also be a good source of minerals, depending on the mineral content of the soil they were grown in. Carbohydrates, like any food or nutrient, however, are only beneficial in the right amount.

If you want to derive all the benefits of carbohydrates, you need to eat them in the amount that is right for you.

Americans need to eat more of the complex variety. More than three quarters of the carbohydrates we consume come from refined sugars and flours.

When sugars or starches become a larger percentage of our diet than best suits our individual biochemistry, carbohydrate toxicity occurs.

Carbohydrate toxicity is increasingly widespread due to the following misconceptions circulated by the media:

  • The more carbohydrates you eat, the better.
  • All carbohydrates are created equal.
  • All fat is bad and should be avoided as much as possible.
  • We eat too much protein and need to eat less.
  • None of the preceding is true. The problem with this erroneous nutritional belief system is that it leads one to overload the body with carbohydrates, and the following problems result:
  • Excess carbohydrate intake displaces protein, which is needed for energy, tissue repair, blood sugar balance, and immune function.
  • Excessive carbohydrate intake will lead to excessive levels of insulin, which can cause weight gain, bloating, fatigue, food cravings, and cardiovascular disease.
  • Faddish high-carbohydrate, ultra-low-fat diets do not provide enough essential fatty acids.
  • Too many carbohydrates, especially concentrated sweeteners, can stress the adrenal glands into a state of exhaustion.
  • Diets too high in carbohydrates upset prostaglandins. a family of hormone-like compounds that must be in balance for health to exist.
  • A diet too high in carbohydrates and too low in protein can cause liver damage.

The right amount of carbohydrates for most people is about 40% of their diet, with emphasis on the complex variety.

More than 50% of the diet as carbohydrates or too many refined carbohydrates causes problems. Complex carbohydrates in the right amount are beneficial.

Those who refine and overeat them bring out their bad side. Too much of anything is bad for the body, and low-fat starchy foods are no exception.

While the preceding percentages are a helpful guide, the optimal intake of carbohydrates will differ for each person.

Some may thrive on a diet that consists mostly of carbohydrates. Most, however, will not. Many women over age thirty will feel-bloated and tired on a diet that is 60% carbohydrates or more.

We are all different, and need to examine our own unique metabolism to determine our optimal range for carbohydrate intake.

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